EEOC ACTING CHAIR LIPNIC RELEASES REPORT ON THE STATE OF OLDER WORKERS AND AGE DISCRIMINATION 50 YEARS AFTER THE ADEA

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 26, 2018

WASHINGTON – Victoria A. Lipnic, Acting Chair of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), issued a report today on the State of Older Workers and Age Discrimination 50 Years After the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA). The ADEA was signed into law in December 1967 and took effect 50 years ago this month, in June 1968. The ADEA was an important part of 1960s civil rights legislation that was intended to ensure equal opportunity for older workers.

The report finds that age discrimination remains too common and too accepted as outdated assumptions about older workers and ability persist, even though today’s experienced workers are more diverse, better educated and working longer than previous generations.

“As we’ve studied the current state of age discrimination this past year in commemorating the ADEA, we’ve seen many similarities between age discrimination and harassment,” explained Acting EEOC Chair Victoria A. Lipnic. “Like harassment, everyone knows it happens every day to workers in all kinds of jobs, but few speak up. It’s an open secret.”

The report recognizes the similarities between age discrimination and other discrimination. Only about 3 percent of those who have experienced age discrimination complained to their employer or a government agency, according to recent research. Studies find that more than three-fourths of older workers surveyed report their age is an obstacle in getting a job. Even with a booming economy and low unemployment, older workers still report they have difficulties getting hired.

Lipnic’s report provides a wealth of information and resources. It includes recommendations from experts on strategies to prevent age discrimination, such as including age in diversity and inclusion programs and having age-diverse hiring panels. Research shows that age diversity can improve organi­za­tional performance and lower employee turnover. Studies also find that mixed-age work teams result in higher productivity for both older and younger workers.

“I hope the report also serves to put to rest outdated assumptions about experienced workers," Acting Chair Lipnic commented. “As I’ve said many times, they have talent that our economy cannot afford to waste.”

The EEOC advances opportunity in the workplace by enforcing federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination. More information is available at www.eeoc.gov. Stay connected with the latest EEOC news by subscribing to our email updates.

Three inducted into Florida Civil Rights Hall of Fame

June 8, 2018

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) — Thursday evening on the campus of Florida State University, three people received quite the honor.

Dr. Marvin Davies, John Dorsey Due and Dr. Reverend Willie Oliver Wells were inducted into the Florida Civil Rights Hall of Fame.
Community leaders say these three individuals made sacrifices to ensure that every Floridian had the right to vote and live where they want.

“If we don’t remember our history, we’re doomed to repeat it. Knowing about these individuals and the sacrifices that they made, to make life better not only for African Americans, but for all Floridians. It’s important that we remember that,” said Curtis Richardson a Tallahassee City Commissioner.

The event hosted by the Florida Commission of Human Relations is in its 7th year. This year’s three inductees join 18 others that have been inducted into the Hall of Fame since its inception.

Full Article and video at WCTV.TV site:

http://www.wctv.tv/content/news/Three-Floridians-enter-Civil-Rights-Hall-of-Fame-484924941.html

The Florida Channel: 6/7/18 Florida Civil Rights Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

The Florida Commission on Human Relations honors Floridians who have made significant contributions to the state for equality and justice. Dr. Marvin Davies, John Dorsey Due, and Dr. Rev. Willie Oliver Wells were officially inducted into the Florida Civil Rights Hall of Fame for 2018.

Full Article at The Florida Channel:

https://thefloridachannel.org/videos/6-7-18-florida-civil-rights-hall-of-fame-induction-ceremony/

FCHR Encourages Everyone to Celebrate National Minority Health Month

April is National Minority Health Month, a time to learn more about the health status of racial and ethnic minority populations in the U.S. The theme for 2018 is Partnering for Health Equity which highlights partnerships at the federal, state, local, tribal and territorial levels that help reduce disparities in health and health care. This year, the Office of Minority Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will celebrate impactful public and private sector collaborations that advance health equity and help improve the health of the nation.

For more information, please visit: https://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/nmhm18/.

Celebrating Minority Health Month

President Lyndon B. Johnson's Remarks Upon Signing the Civil Rights Act.

LBJ Signs Fair Housing Act

Members of the Congress, Members of the Cabinet, distinguished Americans, and guests:

On an April afternoon in the year 1966, I asked a distinguished group of citizens who were interested in human rights to meet me in the Cabinet Room in the White House. In their presence that afternoon, I signed a message to the Congress. That message called for the enactment of "the first effective federal law against discrimination in the sale and the rental of housing" in the United States of America.

Few in the Nation--and the record will show that very few in that room that afternoon--believed that fair housing would--in our time--become the unchallenged law of this land.

And indeed, this bill has had a long and stormy trip.
We did not get it in 1966.

We pleaded for it again in 1967. But the Congress took no action that year.
We asked for it again this year.
And now--at long last this afternoon--its day has come.

I do not exaggerate when I say that the proudest moments of my Presidency have been times such as this when I have signed into law the promises of a century.

I shall never forget that it was more than 100 years ago when Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation--but it was a proclamation; it was not a fact.

In the Civil Rights Act of 1964, we affirmed through law that men equal under God are also equal when they seek a job, when they go to get a meal in a restaurant, or when they seek lodging for the night in any State in the Union.

Now the Negro families no longer suffer the humiliation of being turned away because of their race.

In the Civil Rights Act of 1965, we affirmed through law for every citizen in this land the most basic right of democracy--the right of a citizen to vote in an election in his country. In the five States where the Act had its greater impact, Negro voter registration has already more than doubled.

Now, with this bill, the voice of justice speaks again.

It proclaims that fair housing for all--all human beings who live in this country--is now a part of the American way of life.

We all know that the roots of injustice run deep. But violence cannot redress a solitary wrong, or remedy a single unfairness.

Of course, all America is outraged at the assassination of an outstanding Negro leader who was at that meeting that afternoon in the White House in 1966. And America is also outraged at the looting and the burning that defiles our democracy.

We just must put our shoulders together and put a stop to both. The time is here. Action must be now.

So, I would appeal to my fellow Americans by saying, the only real road to progress for free people is through the process of law and that is the road that America will travel.

I urge the Congress to enact the measures for social justice that I have recommended in some twenty messages. These messages went to the Congress in January and February of this year. They broke a precedent by being completed and delivered and read and printed. These measures provide more than $78 billion that I have urged the Congress to enact for major domestic programs for all Americans in the fiscal 1969 budget.

This afternoon, as we gather here in this historic room in the White House, I think we can all take some heart that democracy's work is being done. In the Civil Rights Act of 1968 America does move forward and the bell of freedom rings out a little louder.

We have come some of the way, not near all of it. There is much yet to do. If the Congress sees fit to act upon these twenty messages and some fifteen appropriations bills, I assure you that what remains to be done will be recommended in ample time for you to do it after you have completed what is already before you.
Thank you very much.

Commentary: Fair housing marks 50 years but it's still elusive for some

On April 11, 1968, President Lyndon Johnson signed the federal Fair Housing Act, which prohibited discrimination concerning the sale, rental and financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin, sex, handicap and family status. This important law also made it unlawful for a housing provider to make, print or publish any statement or advertisement providing for a preference based on these classes.

This year, we Floridians join all Americans in celebrating the 50th anniversary of the federal Fair Housing Act. We are encouraged to learn more about our rights and responsibilities under the act as a part of National Fair Housing Month. For the past 50 years, Americans across this great land are reminded that all citizens are entitled to the same fair housing rights when seeking to rent, own, buy or insure a home, and they are free to take action if they suspect discrimination.

Unfortunately, 50 years of fair housing laws have sometimes failed to deliver justly. For many people of color, fair housing today remains just as elusive as it was in 1968.

 • The homeownership gap between blacks and whites is now wider than it was during the Jim Crow era. Another independent research report by the Economic Policy Institute found that the difference in black homeownership between 1968 and 2018 is virtually the same — 41.1 percent (1968) compared to 41.2 percent (2018).  • In 61 metro areas across the country, blacks were 2.7 times more likely than whites to be denied a conventional mortgage loan.  • As the number of nonbank mortgage lenders rises, these businesses are not required to adhere to the Community Reinvestment Act that requires lending to low-income borrowers and in blighted areas.  The Florida Commission on Human Relations is the state agency charged with investigating cases of housing discrimination. Last year, the FCHR investigated more than 200 cases where housing discrimination was alleged. The top five bases of discrimination were, in order of most to least: disability, race, national origin, familial status and sex.  Even with the passage of the federal act and the Florida Fair Housing Act in 1983, discrimination in housing persists. As executive director of the commission, I often have the opportunity to inform people that they have the power to fight housing discrimination. If they feel they have been discriminated against, they should either contact the FCHR, a fair housing center in their local area or the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as the first step in the process. Remember, “Fair Housing Equals Opportunity.”  While unlawful discrimination continues to keep many individuals and families from obtaining the housing of their choice, the passage half a century ago of the Fair Housing Act took a giant step forward in addressing this issue.   Michelle Wilson is executive director of the Florida Commission on Human Relations. If you feel you are a victim of housing discrimination, call the FCHR at 850-488-7082 or visit  fchr.state.fl.us .

• The homeownership gap between blacks and whites is now wider than it was during the Jim Crow era. Another independent research report by the Economic Policy Institute found that the difference in black homeownership between 1968 and 2018 is virtually the same — 41.1 percent (1968) compared to 41.2 percent (2018).

• In 61 metro areas across the country, blacks were 2.7 times more likely than whites to be denied a conventional mortgage loan.

• As the number of nonbank mortgage lenders rises, these businesses are not required to adhere to the Community Reinvestment Act that requires lending to low-income borrowers and in blighted areas.

The Florida Commission on Human Relations is the state agency charged with investigating cases of housing discrimination. Last year, the FCHR investigated more than 200 cases where housing discrimination was alleged. The top five bases of discrimination were, in order of most to least: disability, race, national origin, familial status and sex.

Even with the passage of the federal act and the Florida Fair Housing Act in 1983, discrimination in housing persists. As executive director of the commission, I often have the opportunity to inform people that they have the power to fight housing discrimination. If they feel they have been discriminated against, they should either contact the FCHR, a fair housing center in their local area or the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as the first step in the process. Remember, “Fair Housing Equals Opportunity.”

While unlawful discrimination continues to keep many individuals and families from obtaining the housing of their choice, the passage half a century ago of the Fair Housing Act took a giant step forward in addressing this issue.

Michelle Wilson is executive director of the Florida Commission on Human Relations. If you feel you are a victim of housing discrimination, call the FCHR at 850-488-7082 or visit fchr.state.fl.us.

 

A year-long analysis of 31 million records by the Center for Investigative Reporting found that: